News
U.S. CLIVAR Science Plan Public Review Now Open
NOAA 2013 Spring Outlook Map

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

The U.S. Climate Variability & Predictability (CLIVAR) Draft Science Plan is now available for public comment through July 3, 2013. The draft plan reflects input from U.S. CLIVAR scientists serving on its Scientific Steering Committee (SSC), three implementation panels, and members of the research community.

Through the open comment period, the SSC seeks comments on the draft plan by the broader U.S. and international science community and the public. Visit the U.S. CLIVAR Science Plan Public Review website to download the Draft Science Plan and provide your comments.

 
Is A Sleeping Climate Giant Stirring in the Arctic?
Is a sleeping climate giant stirring in the arctic?

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Featured by NASA a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program

NASA’s Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) is probing deep into the frozen lands above the Arctic Circle in Alaska to measure emissions of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane from thawing permafrost – signals that may hold a key to Earth’s climate future.

Read more...
 
San Francisco Bay Area Could Lose Marshes to Sea-Level Rise
San Francisco Marshland

Monday, June 10, 2013

Featured by USGS, a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program

According to a new U.S. Geological Survey report, San Francisco Bay - which has already lost the majority of its marsh habitat since the 19th Century - could lose even more marshes by the year 2100, due to sea level rise.

Researchers from the USGS Western Ecological Research Center and the USGS California Water Science Center surveyed the elevation, water levels, sediment and vegetation at 12 marshes near Petaluma River, San Pablo Bay, Napa River and South San Francisco Bay.

Read more...
 
Redesigned Climate.gov Puts Power of Climate Data & Information in Users' Hands
CNew NOAA Climate Website Launched

Monday, June 3, 2013

Featured by NOAA, a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program

NOAA recently unveiled a new and improved version of Climate.gov, a one-stop web resource for information about our changing climate from NOAA and agencies across the federal government. The mission of the website is to provide timely data and information to help build a climate-smart nation.

NOAA's redesigned Climate.gov website offers user-friendly maps, video, imagery, news, and other features available to anyone seeking timely and trusted information, such as community planners, business and policy leaders, scientists, resource managers, broadcast meteorologists, journalists, and educators.

Since the website's launch in 2010, NOAA has engaged in dialogue with climate data users in both the public and private sectors about their needs. Based on feedback, Climate.gov now features a refined interface, enhanced its functionality, and added new content and tools, such as the Global Climate Dashboard and the Integrated Map Application, that make it easier for anyone to find, use, and visualize climate data.

Americans' health, security, and economic well-being are tied to climate and weather. Every day, communities and businesses grapple with environmental challenges due to unusual, extreme, or changing climate and weather conditions. Climate.gov offers actionable information people need to make well-informed decisions.

Click here to read more about the new features of the website.

 
NOAA Predicts Active 2013 Atlantic Hurricane Season

2013 Atlantic Hurricane Season

Thursday, May 23, 2013

Featured by NOAA a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program

In its 2013 Atlantic hurricane season outlook issued today, NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center is forecasting an active or extremely active season this year.

For the six-month hurricane season, which begins June 1, NOAA’s Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook says there is a 70 percent likelihood of 13-20 named storms, of which 7-11 could become hurricanes, including 3-6 major hurricanes. These ranges are well above the seasonal average of 12 named storms, 6 hurricanes and 3 major hurricanes. Read more.

 
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